Cookbookmaniac
  • Tomato and Ricotta Tortellini with Basil by Pete Evans – How to wrap the perfect tortellini
    Cheap Eats Recipes
    Tomato and Ricotta Tortellini with Basil by Pete Evans – How to wrap the perfect tortellini
    Friends are precious commodities that cannot be priced nor taken for granted. They are there for us when we need them and although we lose some along this life journey, there are some that are made to stay. The most confronting part of friends is their ability to tell the truth about ourselves with the best intentions. Whilst food blog surfing, I landed at Sasasunakku's blog post called My Superpower and Raspberry Loaf. She eloquently writes about a book "All my friends have superpowers." Reading this post revealed two truths about me. [1] I am a jack of all trades and master of none. I completed my diploma in photography over 10 years ago, but never made anything out of it. I excel at my boring administrative job, but have not progressed past this position in over 5 years. I am aimless in my intentions to blog. I am not a great cook, writer or photographer. I blog... just to blog. [2] I am The Chip. I have a chip on my shoulder that weighs me down. It holds me back from the things that I could be and causes me to regret the things that I have done. The only person that I have to blame is me. Wholely and solely. I can shake it somedays but on other days it is heavier than a boulder. One day, maybe one day, I’ll have enough heart, soul and might to make it vanish into thin air… one day. Thank you…
  • Twelve in King St, Newtown
    CBD & Inner City
    Twelve in King St, Newtown
    Bad luck follows me wherever I go. There is always something that I am missing out on or something that I have overlooked. One rainy evening, Pizzaboy and I make our way to Newtown to try the newly opened and uber-trendy Bloodwood, only to find the windows shut and lights turned off. It is closed on Tuesdays... bummer. We walk along King St, glum faced and with no idea what to have for dinner. We walked past Twelve a couple of times before deciding on dining here. It was really our hunger that made the final decision. After being shown to our tables and looking over the menu I take a closer look at the restaurant and notice it is tasteful but haphazardly decorated. It's retro-italian, Lygon St, high school mural, arty, home furnishing shop, organic cafe style that somehow meshes together well. The restaurant is empty when we sit down. By the time we leave, it is buzzing and almost at capacity. Our waitress for the evening is new to the job and we are her first customers. It hindered my usual method of ordering (I always ask what are their popular dishes and what they recommend). We order quickly and cross our fingers. The antipasto platter arrives quicker than expected. It is beautifully plated and looks scrumptious. The foccacia bread is slightly stale, it may have been toasted in advance. The buffalo mozzarella is smooth, glossy and porcelain white. It tasted lovely with the sharp tomato sauce and…
  • Asian Recipes
    Falafel – so so yummy!
    Falafel is a fried ball or patty made from spiced fava beans or chickpeas or a combination of the two. Originally from Egypt, falafel is a popular form of street food or fast food in the Middle East. Falafel is usually served in a pita-like bread called lafa, either inside the bread, which acts as a pocket, or wrapped in a flat bread. The falafel balls, whole or crushed, may be topped with salads, pickled vegetables and hot sauce, and drizzled with tahini-based sauces. Falafel balls may also be eaten alone as a snack or served as part of a mezze. Unlike many other bean patties, in falafel, the beans are most commonly not cooked prior to use. Instead they are soaked with bicarbonate of soda, then ground with the addition of a small quantity of onion, parsley, and spices such as cumin and coriander. The mixture is shaped into balls or patties, then deep fried. Sesame seeds are sometimes added before frying; this is particularly common when falafel is served as a dish on its own rather than as a sandwich filling. Recipe adapted from New Flavours of the Jewish Table by Denise Phillips 250g dried chickpeas 3 tablespoons of bulghar wheat 1 large brown onion 5 garlic cloves 1/4 cup finely chopped fresh parsley leaves 1/4 cup finely chopped fresh coriander leaves 3 tablespoons ground cumin 3 tablespoons ground coriander 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper 1 egg 3 tablespoons of…