Cookbookmaniac
  • Asian Recipes
    Thai Kangaroo Salad – What is Australia’s national dish?
    It was Australia Day a week ago. For a longtime I'd been wanting to cook and present one of Australia's National Dishes to the blog. However, I was having a hard time selecting one, or actually, I don't know if I had even found one that didn't have its origins from elsewhere. Pizzaboy and I came up with a few possiblities: Meat Pie & Sauce Shepherds Pie Fish'n'Chips Pavlova Sticky Date Pudding Lamingtons Masterchef runner-up Poh Ling Yeow suggests that it may be Salt & Pepper Squid. I don't think she was too far off. You see, Australia is culturally multi-layered, built by many years of immigration from around the world. Almost all of the world's cuisines are represented here, we are very lucky in that respect. With all this in mind. I do believe that we show our "Australianess" by throwing together a barbeque. Everyone can bring whatever they want and "chuck it on the barbie". It is an opportunity to take advantage of the fresh produce that is available to us, soak up the warm climate and relax. What can be more Australian than that? I received my copy of Delicious magazine in the mail and my decision was made when I came across a recipe for Thai Kangaroo Salad. Jill Dupleix makes the following observation, "It makes sense that if we are to produce our food from animals, that we do it from those that belong here. I bet if Thailand had kangaroo, they'd cook it like…
  • Asian Recipes
    Pho Bo – Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup
    There is a grace that permeates through every nook and cranny of my home when this pot is brewing in the kitchen. It is the thing that gives my body a sense of safety and nurture. It is the meal that I call home, and whenever I catch a whiff of the precious spices simmering along with the marrow bones, my neck instantly arches up and my nose points up into the air. "Yes, a fresh pot is brewing". An engaged and knowing smile crosses my heart and I know I must give in to the temptation to what Vietnamese call Phở. There must be some magical formula that causes the hard-working people of Vietnam to participate in the ritual of eating this morning, noon and night. It is too good to save for one time of the day, and if your cravings dictate when you eat, you too may find yourself huddling at a table, slurping away at the smooth as silk rice noodles first thing in the morning with your family. There is also the never ending search for the ultimate broth. No matter how unapologetically perfect one's broth has become... it could be better. Every chef or cook of a pho noodle house understands that no matter how good their broth is, they will never cease to make adjustments to find the ultimate, most succulent broth known to humans. Then there are the rumours, perhaps pedalled along by non-believers, accusing that the addictive nature of this dish…
  • Asian Recipes
    Gyoza – Japanese Pan-fried Dumplings
    Gyōza is a japanese dumpling with origins from China. They were introduced to Japan after WWII when the Japanese soldiers returned to their homeland from China. It is now a staple in every Japanese home kitchen and is commonly eaten as a side dish to ramen. Gyōza typically consist of a ground meat and/or vegetable filling wrapped into a thinly rolled piece of dough, which is then sealed by pressing the edges together or by crimping. Gyōza should not be confused with wonton. Gyōza have a thicker, chewier skin and a flatter, crescent like shape, and are usually eaten with a soy-vinegar dipping sauce (and/or hot chili sauce); while wontons have thinner skin, are sphere-shaped, and are usually served in broth. The most popular preparation method is the pan-fried style, in which the dumpling is first fried on one flat side, creating a crispy skin. Then, water is added and the pan sealed with a lid, until the upper part of the gyōza is steamed. Recipe adapted from Asian Dumplings by Andrea Nguyen Gyōza Recipe 350g minced pork 120g finely shredded chinese cabbage (napa cabbage or wombok) 2 teaspoons minced garlic 1/3 cup of finely chopped spring onion 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper 2 tablespoon japanese soy sauce 1 tablespoon mirin 1 tablespoon sake 1 egg canola oil sesame oil simmering water Dipping Sauce 2 tablespoons of japanese soy sauce 2 tablespoons of rice vinegar Method 1/ In a bowl mix the pork, cabbage, spring onions and…