Cookbookmaniac
  • Cheap Eats Recipes
    Eggplant Parmigiana – A Vegetarians Delight
    I've never been a big fan of eggplant. The oblong, deep purple nightshade has always struck me as somewhat bland and mealy. One day, Pizzaboy's Italian Aunt, made eggplant parmigiana as an entree for a Christmas Eve meal. I have been converted ever since. Parmigiana is a classic Southern Italian dish made with thick slices of eggplant that are fried in olive oil until golden then layered with tomato sauce, mozzarella cheese, and basil and baked until bubbly. Variations made with breaded meat cutlets, such as veal and chicken parmigiana, have been developed in other countries, usually in areas of Italian immigration. In some recipes the eggplant is breaded and fried. While this adds a whole extra layer of texture, I don't think it's necessary. There are many versions of eggplant parmigiana. I probably like them all. The earthy sweetness of the eggplant and tomato sauce, the gooey mozzarella, and the sharpness of the parmesan all come together to make something delectable. Recipe adapted from Miss Dahl's Voluptuous Delights by Sophie Dahl 2 medium-sized eggplants 1/2 cup olive oil 1 large onion, finely diced 2 teaspoons garlic, minced 800g can of chopped tomatoes 2 tablespoons of tomato paste 3 tablespoons of dry white wine 1 tablespoon soft brown sugar 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 cup of shredded fresh basil leaves 250g bocconcini or buffalo mozzarella, sliced 1/2 cup of shredded parmesan cheese Salt & Pepper to taste 1/ Slice eggplant into 1cm thick slices. Lay them on a flat surface…
  • American Recipes
    Jerk Chicken – Everyone needs jerk at the bbq!
    My first introduction to Jamaican food was at the Glebe Street Markets in November. I waited in line to order for over 20 minutes just wanting to try something different. The wait was made a lot easier because the cooks were very handsome and buff. I also noticed that they were practicing safe-hygiene, there was a sink to wash hands, boxes of disposable gloves conveniently attached to the rafters, the gentleman handling the cash was not handling the food. They ran out of rice, so I asked for an extra salad. I didn't know what to expect. The only thing I knew about jamaican cuisine was from cookbooks. To my elation my meal was delicious. The chicken was mildly spicy and despite is charcoal exterior it was perfectly cooked and smoky. The mango salsa was fantastic, it was sweet and very soft. The salsa complimented the chicken very well. The coleslaw was average and nothing really excited me about it. Jerk is a style of cooking native to Jamaica in which meats are dry-rubbed or marinated with a very hot spice mixture called Jamaican jerk spice. This usually consists of a combination of spring onions (scallions), onions, thyme, pimento (Jamaican allspice), cinnamon, nutmeg, chilies, garlic and salt. Jerk seasoning is traditionally applied to pork, chicken, seafood, beef, fruits and vegetables and is cooked over a fire pit or on a barbecue grill. Street-side "jerk stands" are frequently found throughout Jamaica. Jerked meat, usually chicken or pork, can be purchased along…
  • Asian Recipes
    Japanese-style Potato Salad – a bit like mash potato
    Recipe adapted from Harumi's Japanese Home Cooking by Harumi Kurihara Potato Salad is one of those great salads that appear across many cultures. Its seems to be one of those dishes where everybody has their own favourite way of making it and always claims to be the best. Potatoes are not a part of traditional japanese cuisine, however it is now very popular in modern day Japan. They often appear in bento boxes, or sandwiched between two slices of bread. Japanese potato salad has a mild, creamy flavor, with no acidic undertone; unlike American or German style potato salads, no vinegar is used. It's seasoned only with salt and a little pepper, and lots and lots of mayonnaise. Chopped boiled egg adds to the richness. 1kg desiree potatoes, peeled 3 large hard boiled eggs, roughly diced 1 medium carrot, finely shredded 1 teaspoon granulated chicken stock powder 1 medium lebanese cucumber 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 cup of brown onion, finely diced 1 cup kewpie japanese mayonnaise 1/ Wash the potatoes, carrots and cucumber 2/ Bring a pot of water to boil. Place the potatoes in the pot (leave them whole). Turn the heat down to medium-high. Potatoes are done when you can slide a chopstick through the thickest part without too much resistance or cook for approx 20 minutes. 3/ Transfer the potatoes to a bowl and roughly break them up. Mix in the chicken stock powder and leave to cool. 4/ Cut the cucumber in half length-ways and then…