Cookbookmaniac
  • Fattouch with a twist
    Cheap Eats Recipes
    Fattouch with a twist
    In an attempt at being a little more healthy I converted one of my all-time favourite salads to include a wholegrain and less fat. I went on an accidental healthfood shopping spree with a friend and I picked up a packet of the ancient grain, quinoa, which seems to have suddenly taken the health-conscience western world by storm. It was simple to prepare and its addition did not seem to interfere with the true essence of the recipe. Instead of deep-fried flatbread, I used toasted, leftover sourdough bread. I must confess, the inclusion of these croutons was more out of frugality than mere health concerns. We had a remaining half a loaf from the previous nights delicious beef bourguignon. I couldn't bear to see it go to waste. It toasted up a treat and I added it in at the very moment I was ready to consume this superfood salad. These bite-size cubes can get very soggy when sitting in the dressing. Ingredients Recipe adapted from New Flavours of the Lebanese Table┬áby Nada Saleh 2 tablespoons organic white quinoa 2 roma tomatoes 1 cucumber 4 radishes 1/2 red onion 4 leaves of cos lettuce handful of flat parsley leaves half-handful of fresh mint juice of half a lemon 1 teaspoon of pomegranate molasses 1 garlic clove, crushed 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil approx 2 large slices of sourdough bread 1/2 teaspoon sumac 1/ Rinse the quinoa in a bowl of water and drain. Fill a small pot with water…
  • Roasted Eggplant with Saffron Yoghurt by Ottolenghi
    European Recipes
    Roasted Eggplant with Saffron Yoghurt by Ottolenghi
    "Oh my goodness. You have so many cookbooks. Do you cook from them all?" This is the question asked by most people who are perplexed by the size of my collection. In fact the IKEA shelf that I purchased specifically to house them is now full and there are books overflowing onto the floor. Most of the books that end up on the floor are far too obese for the lean wooden shelves (Ripailles - yes, I am talking about you). Quite often I purchase a cookbook for its potential. This is the possibility of creating something that will satisfy my greedy appetite. If I only get one 'great recipe' out of a cookbook, then I consider it worth its value, at the very least. I recently purchased Ottolenghi - The Cookbook and was flabbergasted by the quality and diversity of the recipes. I could not flick pass one page without cooing, pointing or bookmarking it. Every recipe is filled with vibrant ingredient combinations that are not only healthy, but delicious. The other thing that astounded me was that the ingredients used in the book can be accessible (in my opinion). I could not settle on a recipe, so I randomly flicked open a page in the salad section and landed on the Roasted Eggplant with Saffron Yoghurt. I did the same for the Meat and Fish section and got the Roast chicken with Sumac, Za'atar and Lemon. Both recipes turned out fantastic. It is cookbooks like this that puts…
  • Asian Recipes
    Fortune Cookies – Happy Chinese New Year!!
    Gung Hei Fat Choi!! Happy Chinese New Year!! I absolutely love this time of year. It's my version of Christmas. The streets are decorated with red and gold signs, lanterns and flowers. They are also full of people lining up to watch the parade of lion dancing, firecrackers, and talented musicians smashing away on huge drums and gongs. Everyone is so happy and giving, wishing you good fortune for the new year to come. Isn't it wonderful! My huge family always gathers together for a feast and silent prayer. Don't get me wrong, I am not religious but I feel a quiet grace when I thank my ancestors and the deities that be, for the good fortune that I have presently and for the many that I will receive in the future. It is humbling and I feel very grateful. I decided to make fortune cookies for my Chinese New Year theme blog post. Like a diligent little elf, I made sure I did my research before I started. Double-checking that I had the right recipe and information. It was to my utter devastation that I found out, Fortune Cookies are not traditionally Chinese. They were concocted by some Asian cook in an American kitchen. It felt like someone has just told me Santa Claus doesn't exist. So I threw the idea away and started looking for something else. But when the time came to make something, the Fortune Cookie idea wouldn't leave me. So, what if it isn't traditional?…