Cookbookmaniac
  • Asian Recipes
    Gyoza – Japanese Pan-fried Dumplings
    Gyōza is a japanese dumpling with origins from China. They were introduced to Japan after WWII when the Japanese soldiers returned to their homeland from China. It is now a staple in every Japanese home kitchen and is commonly eaten as a side dish to ramen. Gyōza typically consist of a ground meat and/or vegetable filling wrapped into a thinly rolled piece of dough, which is then sealed by pressing the edges together or by crimping. Gyōza should not be confused with wonton. Gyōza have a thicker, chewier skin and a flatter, crescent like shape, and are usually eaten with a soy-vinegar dipping sauce (and/or hot chili sauce); while wontons have thinner skin, are sphere-shaped, and are usually served in broth. The most popular preparation method is the pan-fried style, in which the dumpling is first fried on one flat side, creating a crispy skin. Then, water is added and the pan sealed with a lid, until the upper part of the gyōza is steamed. Recipe adapted from Asian Dumplings by Andrea Nguyen Gyōza Recipe 350g minced pork 120g finely shredded chinese cabbage (napa cabbage or wombok) 2 teaspoons minced garlic 1/3 cup of finely chopped spring onion 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper 2 tablespoon japanese soy sauce 1 tablespoon mirin 1 tablespoon sake 1 egg canola oil sesame oil simmering water Dipping Sauce 2 tablespoons of japanese soy sauce 2 tablespoons of rice vinegar Method 1/ In a bowl mix the pork, cabbage, spring onions and…
  • CBD & Inner City
    Bodega Tapas Restaurant & Bar; Rockabilly + Pin Up Girls + Tapas = Modern dining at its best!
    tapas - (esp. in Spain) a snack or appetizer, typically served with wine or beer. There is much ado about Bodega, its been listed as the best tapas restaurant in Sydney by almost every food writer, food critic and food blogger. I had to go taste for myself what all the noise was about. It had been a hard week at the office, I was adamant that Pizzaboy and I go out for dinner that Friday night. There is nothing better than a good meal to cleanse the soul. We arrived at the premises 10 minutes before opening. We were second in line and the summer heat had cooled off, mercifully. Once 6pm came around we were promptly shown our seats and offered drinks. Pizzaboy and I don't usually drink alcohol with our meals, so we politely decline and are given the food menu. A quick look around I instantly fall in love with the place. The walls are adorned with a tripped out graffiti-come-pop art mural of the sexiest bullfighter you'll ever see. And then there are the staff! The boys in the kitchen are channeling modern rockabilly and the girls on the floor are all red lips and pin-up girl hair. There is an incredible range on the menu. There are some things I do not recognise. The lovely waitress more than politely explains the items in question. Pizzaboy is stunned and leaves the ordering up to me. I choose 2 must-have dishes (according to many food critics)…
  • Asian Recipes
    Falafel – so so yummy!
    Falafel is a fried ball or patty made from spiced fava beans or chickpeas or a combination of the two. Originally from Egypt, falafel is a popular form of street food or fast food in the Middle East. Falafel is usually served in a pita-like bread called lafa, either inside the bread, which acts as a pocket, or wrapped in a flat bread. The falafel balls, whole or crushed, may be topped with salads, pickled vegetables and hot sauce, and drizzled with tahini-based sauces. Falafel balls may also be eaten alone as a snack or served as part of a mezze. Unlike many other bean patties, in falafel, the beans are most commonly not cooked prior to use. Instead they are soaked with bicarbonate of soda, then ground with the addition of a small quantity of onion, parsley, and spices such as cumin and coriander. The mixture is shaped into balls or patties, then deep fried. Sesame seeds are sometimes added before frying; this is particularly common when falafel is served as a dish on its own rather than as a sandwich filling. Recipe adapted from New Flavours of the Jewish Table by Denise Phillips 250g dried chickpeas 3 tablespoons of bulghar wheat 1 large brown onion 5 garlic cloves 1/4 cup finely chopped fresh parsley leaves 1/4 cup finely chopped fresh coriander leaves 3 tablespoons ground cumin 3 tablespoons ground coriander 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper 1 egg 3 tablespoons of…