Cookbookmaniac
  • American Recipes
    Homemade Pop Tarts – AMAZING!!
    Pop Tarts were my preferred choice of breakfast back in the days of high school. My mother was always concerned that I was not getting a healthy breakfast, but I was never an early riser and these were ready in a matter of minutes before I rushed out the door. After ten years, I no longer eat pop tarts, but I still rush out the door to head to work. Old habits die-hard. I was looking to make a sweet pastry pie, so I bought Bubby's Homemade Pies. (I will use any excuse to buy a beautiful cookbook). Sweet pastry pies are not very widespread in Australia like they are in the US. The only ones I find easily available are from Sara Lee in the frozen food section at the supermarket. Movies & TV Shows like Fried Green Tomatoes, Waitress and Pushing Daisies, have propelled my craving for this quintessential American dessert. When I got the book, I was very nervous about making pastry. I have never ventured that far in dessert-making, it seemed to be something that should only be left to the professionals and not cooking neophytes like myself. I decided that I would make the Homemade Pop Tart recipe. I have never eaten a real hearty pie like the ones made in Pushing Daisies, therefore I would be going in blind when making it. The stakes were against me and the task seems too huge and risky, I would be so mad at myself if I…
  • American Recipes
    Wagyu Rump Steak with Parsley & Chive Butter
    Salt before you cook "I always salt my meat liberally just before I cook it. Forget the dire warnings that salt will draw out the juices from your meat and leave it dry and tough. This is nonsense. Salting before you cook is not only essential to bring out the intrinsic flavour of your meat, but it also actually helps brown it." - by Adrian Richardson Recipe for steak adapted from Meat by Adrian Richardson Recipe for Parsley & Chive Butter is an original recipe by cookbookmaniac.com 2 x 400g Wagyu Rump Steak Extra-Virgin Olive Oil 2 teaspoons Maldon Sea Salt, more if needed 1 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper, more if needed Parsley & Chive Butter 125g unsalted butter, softened at room temperature 2 teaspoons dried parsley 2 teaspoons dried chives 1 teaspoon Maldon Sea Salt 1/ Take the butter out of the fridge and allow it to come to room temperature. When it is soft add the dried parsley, dried chives and sea salt. Mix well, and put it back in the fridge for later use. 2/ Remove the steak from the refrigerator at least 30 minutes before you are ready to cook it. 3/ Rub the steak lightly with olive oil, salt and pepper. 4/ Cook the steak over medium heat for 3 minutes, then turn and cook for another 3 minutes. Turn again, this time at a 180-degree angle, and cook for another 2 minutes. Turn a final time and cook for another 2 minutes. The…
  • American Recipes
    Jerk Chicken – Everyone needs jerk at the bbq!
    My first introduction to Jamaican food was at the Glebe Street Markets in November. I waited in line to order for over 20 minutes just wanting to try something different. The wait was made a lot easier because the cooks were very handsome and buff. I also noticed that they were practicing safe-hygiene, there was a sink to wash hands, boxes of disposable gloves conveniently attached to the rafters, the gentleman handling the cash was not handling the food. They ran out of rice, so I asked for an extra salad. I didn't know what to expect. The only thing I knew about jamaican cuisine was from cookbooks. To my elation my meal was delicious. The chicken was mildly spicy and despite is charcoal exterior it was perfectly cooked and smoky. The mango salsa was fantastic, it was sweet and very soft. The salsa complimented the chicken very well. The coleslaw was average and nothing really excited me about it. Jerk is a style of cooking native to Jamaica in which meats are dry-rubbed or marinated with a very hot spice mixture called Jamaican jerk spice. This usually consists of a combination of spring onions (scallions), onions, thyme, pimento (Jamaican allspice), cinnamon, nutmeg, chilies, garlic and salt. Jerk seasoning is traditionally applied to pork, chicken, seafood, beef, fruits and vegetables and is cooked over a fire pit or on a barbecue grill. Street-side "jerk stands" are frequently found throughout Jamaica. Jerked meat, usually chicken or pork, can be purchased along…